An illustrated guide to creating virtual field trips using Google Services

With this resource, users can learn to create virtual field trips for free. This guide and video will show you how to create virtual field trips in Google Earth by utilizing some of Google’s FREE online services such as Blogger, YouTube and Google Sketchup.

The zip file available here includes:
A booklet with instructions on how to create a virtual field trip using free online services.

To reinforce the ideas presented, a video that goes through what is covered in the booklet is also provided. Users must create a free login to access the materials.

Last Updated: 2007

This resource is quite large and requires your email to download.

Click here to request to download the file

Point Source Water Contamination Module

The “Defining Energy Technologies and Services” careers chart provides a snapshot view of energy technology careers at the technician level. This wall-mountable poster is a great quick reference for students, technicians, employers, educators, and government representatives.

ATEEC has collected information from expert practitioners and educators in the field to generate the 2008 Defining Energy Technologies and Services report, distilling a wide ranging field of occupations into an easy-to-understand overview of the energy field technician occupations and job functions. The chart from this report is provided here as a mini-poster (11″ x 17″) to use as a quick reference to the energy technology and services field.

PDF file

Author(s):
Advanced Technology Environmental Education Center
Eastern Iowa Community Colleges, IA

Click here to download the file

Nonpoint Source Water Contamination Module

The “Defining Energy Technologies and Services” careers chart provides a snapshot view of energy technology careers at the technician level. This wall-mountable poster is a great quick reference for students, technicians, employers, educators, and government representatives.

ATEEC has collected information from expert practitioners and educators in the field to generate the 2008 Defining Energy Technologies and Services report, distilling a wide ranging field of occupations into an easy-to-understand overview of the energy field technician occupations and job functions. The chart from this report is provided here as a mini-poster (11″ x 17″) to use as a quick reference to the energy technology and services field.

PDF file

Author(s):
Advanced Technology Environmental Education Center
Eastern Iowa Community Colleges, IA

Click here to download the file.

Nonpoint Source Water Contamination

This updated module is part of a series of instructional environmental materials titled Technology and Environmental Decision-Making: A critical-thinking approach to 7 environmental challenges. The module is aimed at college and high school instructors, to deliver science-based background information and the latest research on nonpoint source water contamination. Additionally, it promotes teaching critical thinking through the inclusion of resources and activities for use in the classroom.

ATEEC has updated other selected modules from the series, including:

Technology and Environmental Decision-Making

ATEEC and MIT teamed up to produce Technology and Environmental Decision-Making: A critical-thinking approach to 7 environmental challenges. This is a series of seven high quality instructional modules developed by researchers and instructional designers. The series, aimed at college and high school instructors, delivers science-based background information and the latest research on a variety of environmental concerns. The modules provide a refresher for the instructor on the scientific background of each environmental issue. Additionally, they promote teaching critical thinking through the inclusion of resources and activities for use in the classroom.

The original seven modules are available either as a zip file or on CD. Topics include:

  • Air quality,
  • Climate change,
  • Energy-efficient vehicles,
  • Environmental decision-making processes,
  • MTBE contamination,
  • Nonpoint source water contamination, and
  • Point source water contamination.
    Download a zip file of the original module series.
    Please note: You’ll be redirected to Dropbox.com to download the zip file.

ATEEC has since updated selected modules from the series, available as pdf documents, including:

Defining Energy Technologies and Services Careers Chart

The “Defining Energy Technologies and Services” careers chart provides a snapshot view of energy technology careers at the technician level. This wall-mountable poster is a great quick reference for students, technicians, employers, educators, and government representatives.

ATEEC has collected information from expert practitioners and educators in the field to generate the 2016 Defining Energy Technologies and Services report, distilling a wide ranging field of occupations into an easy-to-understand overview of the energy field technician occupations and job functions. The chart from this report is provided here as a mini-poster (11″ x 17″) to use as a quick reference to the energy technology and services field.

PDF file

Author(s):
Advanced Technology Environmental & Energy Center
Eastern Iowa Community Colleges, IA

Click here to download the file.

Defining Environmental Technology Report

Keeping the education field ahead of the curve on careers in the environmental technology field, ATEEC recently released an updated version of the Defining Environmental Technology report.

This report, first produced in 1996 and last updated in 2008, lists the occupational categories, titles, and functions in the Environmental Technology field as defined by a panel of industry experts.

Changes in the 2014 edition include the expansion of water-related occupational categories and the confirmation of sustainability as a full-fledged occupational category. (It had been identified as an “emerging occupational field” in the 2008 edition.)

These changes reflect the ongoing integration of business and environmental concern.

ATEEC collaborated with the Partnership for Environmental Technology Education (www.nationalpete.org) to select the highly qualified panel of 20 business, industry, and government agency representatives, as well as two- and four- year college environmental technology educators.

These experts participated in a two-day forum defining the environmental technology field as it relates to the two-year technician level.

A primary purpose of this report is to enhance counselor, teacher, and student awareness of environmental careers at the technician level.

This report also contributes to addressing the workforce development needs of business, industry, and government by providing educators with information needed to develop relevant curriculum that prepares students for environmental technology careers.

Defining Environmental Technology can be downloaded for free at https://ateec.org/defining-environmental-tech-report/.

ATEEC Report, “Regional Water Conversations”

ATEEC has just released a unique new report that provides a snapshot of water technology issues in different regions across the U.S. “Regional Water Conversations” gathered input from the Midwest, Mountain West, Northeast, Northwest, Southeast, and Southwest areas of the country to provide specific regional input on technician-level occupations and issues in the water management field.

ATEEC used these Conversation forums to build on information gathered in its 2013 national “Defining Water Management” report, with the goal of further definitizing the water field based on regional similarities and differences. Six community colleges across the country were chosen to host the series of conversations with business and industry. Host colleges included:

  • Bristol Community College and New England Interstate Water Pollution Control Commission (Massachusetts)
  • Central Carolina Community College (South Carolina)
  • Cuyamaca College (California)
  • Eastern Iowa Community Colleges (Iowa)
  • Lane Community College (Oregon)
  • Red Rocks Community College (Colorado)

The discussions helped document and analyze the regional applicability of the previous national results in the water management field. The resulting report provided information on differentiation and consistency among the regions in areas of:

  • Technician-level occupational titles and job functions
  • Fastest-growing jobs
  • Certification and licensure requirements
  • Best practices and documentation
  • Cross-cutting technical and employability knowledge and skills
  • Future trends and emerging issues in the field

One of the highlights of the report is a chart listing the “Fastest-Growing Technician Jobs in the Water Field” as:

  • Midwest: Water Treatment Operator, Wastewater Plant Operator, Stormwater/MS4 Technician, Environmental Sampling/Monitoring Technician, Green Infrastructure Specialist, and IT Professional
  • Mountain West: Water Treatment Operator, PLC/SCADA Specialist, Water Reclamation Plant Operator, Distribution Operator, Instrumentation & Control Technician, Asset & Capital Improvement Planning Manager, and Collection System Operator
  • Northeast: Water & Wastewater Operators, Instrumentation Technician, SCADA Technician, Maintenance Technician, Drinking Water Operator, and Collection Systems Operator
  • Northwest: PLC/SCADA Programmer, Instrumentation Technician, Operations Technician, Stormwater Facility Installation/Maintenance Specialist, GIS Specialist, and Water Treatment Operator
  • Southeast: Water Treatment Operator, Wastewater Plant Operator, Plant Maintenance Technician, Utility Locator, Process Control Technician, PLC/SCADA Technician, and Lab Technician
  • Southwest: Water Treatment Operator, Wastewater Plant Operator, Environmental Compliance Technician, Instrumentation Technician, PLC/SCADA Programmer, Mechanical Maintenance Technician, Water Conservation Technician

(Occupations in bold indicate similar job needs across the board.)

The “Regional Water Conversations” and “Defining Water Management” reports and posters are available in both print and electronic formats. The reports are being disseminated to business and industry professionals, educators, technicians, students, and other stakeholders throughout the country via the Resources section of ATEEC’s website at ateec.org.

(Click the image below to go directly to the report.)

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